A tradition, a change, a legacy: What to expect during this year’s ‘Senior Colloquium.”

National Organizational Communication Association President Christophe Robertson

 

There will be a noticeable change in what has become an annual campus ceremony. During “Senior Colloquium,” the two main events will be held on two separate nights at two different locations.

According to National Organizational Communication Association President Christophe Robertson, the colloquium is set for Monday, Apr. 30 on the first floor of D Vickers Hall. The “Pinning Ceremony” is set for Thursday, May 3 in the Alumni Center.

NOCA Vice President Allison Davis explains that the “Senior Colloquium” was altered to allow audience members to attend different presentations if they wished to. Holding the ceremony on the first floor is an effort to prevent accessibility issues for attendees. “Pinning Ceremony” changes were done to ease some of the uncertainty that graduating seniors may have about their progression in the course Communication 498.

“This change allows the Communication 498 students to have turned in their paper, presented their paper and taken their comprehensive exams,” said Davis. “Once these are all done, you will be pinned if you pass the class, and top paper will be announced. I am eager to see how everything turns out because I am a firm believer in allowing change.”

Times for both events are still in the works.

Robertson explained that his plans are centered around making the events appealing to communication majors and other audience members while ensuring that they occur in a timely fashion.

Davis explains why she believes that both ceremonies are imperative aspects to a graduating communication major’s journey; including her own.

“The pinning ceremony is a small moment to recognize a long process,” said Davis. “I think finally being pinned will be like a breath of fresh air, but like any good communication major, we will soon enough be ready for the next challenge to face.”

According to Robertson, NOCA’s goal as an organization is to provide members with knowledge and experience of responsibilities related to the field of organizational communication. Robertson shares what he has learned about organizing ceremonies from previous NOCA presidents.

“Plans for the event should be given much time and consideration way in advance,” said Robertson. “Each duty is important and should not be placed on a lower level.”

NOCA Public Relations Chair Sarah Cooper handed pins to graduates during last year’s ceremony. She shares how the experience gave her a different perspective of being involved in organizational communication responsibilities.

“Seniors work really hard on their thesis,” said Cooper. “A lot of work goes into this. This is an opportunity for seniors to present their findings in front of an audience and show what different aspects within the field of communication are about.”

Davis explains why she believes  both ceremonies are imperative aspects to a graduating communication major’s journey.

“The pinning ceremony is a small moment to recognize a long process,” said Daivs. “I think finally being pinned will be like a breath of fresh air, but like any good communication major, we will soon enough be ready for the next challenge to face.”

Because the organization has been responsible for planning and hosting the ceremony for the last few semesters, Robertson admits that he feels pressure to ensure the event will go as planned. He shares what he has learned about organizing ceremonies based on the performances of previous NOCA presidents.

“Plans for the event should be given much time and consideration way in advance,” said Robertson. “Each duty is important and should not be placed on a lower level.”

Robertson cites the biggest challenge in planning two separate ceremonies this year. Robertson said, “We still are preparing plans for it, but the toughest part is making sure the event is appealing to not only the Comm 498 students, but also to the people attending. We want to make sure the events occur in a timely fashion while also making sure that the presentations are done properly and effectively.”

Davis, who is set to present at the colloquium, believes that the event offers audience members the opportunity to learn what the true capacity of a research project looks like.

“It is an eye opening moment, when you take a small phenomenon you wouldn’t normally take notice of, and expand it out to understand the concept in an academic setting,” said Davis. “Even though it is an academic environment, there is a sense of entertainment involved in the colloquium.”

 

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